|Tag:tomato

WorldVeg parentage in high-yielding, triple-disease resistant ‘Arka Rakshak’ tomato

Tomato is India’s second most important vegetable crop, next to potato. And now ‘Arka Rakshak’, a new F1 fresh market and processing tomato hybrid with resistance to three major tomato diseases, is available for farmers eager to supply India’s growing demand. The variety was developed by the Indian Institute of Horticultural Research (IIHR) by crossing one of their advanced breeding lines with an advanced breeding line sourced from the World Vegetable Center. Tomato leaf curl virus, bacterial wilt and early blight are among the most difficult tomato diseases to manage as there are no chemical treatments available to stop their spread. Building resistance into a variety is the most effective -- and cost-effective -- approach to tomato disease management. ‘Arka Rakshak’ produces medium to large (80-100 g), deep red, very firm fruits with good keeping quality (15-20 days) and transportability. Farmers can expect yields of 90-100 t/ha. WorldVeg provides the important breeding materials partners need to produce vigorous, pest-and disease-resistant varieties with tolerance to heat, drought, flooding and other environmental conditions farmers typically encounter in the field. Congratulations to IIHR!

2018-02-09T02:56:34+00:00 February 9th, 2018|Categories: Briefing, FEB2018, In Brief|Tags: , , |

International research on vegetable improvement in East and Southern Africa: Adoption, impact and returns

This study analyzes the adoption of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and African eggplant (Solanum aethiopicum) varieties developed through international agricultural research, released by national agricultural research and extension systems (NARES) and supplied to farmers by private seed companies in East and Southern Africa from 1990 to 2015. We found that 50% of tomato and 98% of African eggplant commercial seed production in the region were varieties developed by the World Vegetable Center. WorldVeg and NARES invested US$ 6.9 million in research, extension, and promotion of these two crops. This generated economic gains of US$ 254 million for tomato and US$ 5 million for African eggplant in Tanzania up to 2014. The internal rate of return is 29.3% for tomato and 12.3% for African eggplant, though we project the latter to increase to 26.0% by 2024 as adoption only started in 2007. These results indicate international research into vegetable improvement to give returns to investment that are as high as those previously reported for some staple crops.

2017-08-01T09:31:38+00:00 August 1st, 2017|Categories: Recent Research|Tags: , |

Characterization of pre- and postharvest losses of tomato supply chain in Ethiopia

Results indicate that tomato production is being done by relatively young married individuals who have at least primary level education. More than 16% of respondents encounter produce losses due to high incidence of diseases, insect pest and mechanical injuries, each of them accounting for more than 20% of postharvest losses.

2017-04-25T05:40:04+00:00 April 25th, 2017|Categories: APR2017, Recent Research|Tags: , , |

Evaluation of wild tomato accessions

Tomato wild relatives are important sources of resistance to many pests of cultivated tomato [Solanum lycopersicum L. (syn. Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.)]. Eleven wild tomato accessions previously identified at the World Vegetable Center as resistant to Bemisia tabaci were evaluated for resistance to the two-spotted spider mite [Tetranychus urticae (Koch.)] Resistance to T. urticae based on the number of eggs from the no-choice bioassays was positively correlated with density of type IV glandular trichomes and negatively correlated with densities of type V trichomes. All resistant accessions accumulated high levels of total acylsugars, which were positively associated with type IV trichomes.

2016-10-22T04:50:26+00:00 July 6th, 2016|Categories: Recent Research|Tags: , , , |